Last edited by Mole
Saturday, April 25, 2020 | History

5 edition of The Swiss multi-pillar pension system found in the catalog.

The Swiss multi-pillar pension system

Monika Queisser

The Swiss multi-pillar pension system

triumph of common sense?

by Monika Queisser

  • 221 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by World Bank, Development Research Group, Finance in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Switzerland.,
  • Switzerland
    • Subjects:
    • Pensions -- Switzerland.,
    • Pensions -- Switzerland -- Statistics.,
    • Pension trusts -- Switzerland.

    • About the Edition

      Switzerland is the first country to have publicly articulated the benefits of a multi-pillar approach to pensions and the first OECD country to have mandated that employers provide occupational pension plans for their employees. Not surprising, the Swiss system has many unique and attractive features.

      Edition Notes

      StatementMonika Queisser and Dimitri Vittas.
      GenreStatistics.
      SeriesPolicy research working paper ;, 2416, Policy research working papers (Online) ;, 2416.
      ContributionsVittas, Dimitri., World Bank. Development Research Group. Finance.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
      The Physical Object
      FormatElectronic resource
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3669383M
      LC Control Number2002616221

      The Netherlands is regularly praised in international policy circles for two central aspects of socio-economic policy: its multi-pillar pension system and its ‘flexicurity’ reforms. The Dutch multi-pillar pension approach has a long tradition, but flexicurity is a more recent policy by: 1. INSUROPE. NEWS. multi-employer pools Swiss Life. Yes, a client may participate in Swiss Life’s small group pool with one poolable contract and at least 10 lives. pension funds, book reserves. The final reasoning was the Law “On Funded Pensions” made on Decem by the RA National Assembly. Thus, the pension system in Armenia became a multi pillar one: 2 new voluntary and mandatory funded pension components have been introduced. The edition of Pensions at a Glance highlights the pension reforms undertaken by OECD countries over the last two years. Moreover, two special chapters focus on non-standard work and pensions in OECD countries, take stock of different approaches to organising pensions for non-standard workers in the OECD, discuss why non-standard work raises pension issues and suggest how pension settings.


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The Swiss multi-pillar pension system by Monika Queisser Download PDF EPUB FB2

August Switzerland is the first country to have publicly articulated the benefits of a multi-pillar approach to pensions and the first OECD country to have mandated that employers provide occupational pension plans for their employees.

Not surprising, the Swiss. Get this from a library. The Swiss multi-pillar pension system: triumph of common sense?.

[Monika Queisser; Dimitri Vittas; World Bank. Development Research Group. Finance.] -- Switzerland is the first country to have publicly articulated the benefits of a multi-pillar approach to pensions and the first OECD country to have mandated that employers provide occupational.

This paper provides a detailed study of the Swiss multi-pillar pension system, analyzing its strengths and weaknesses. The unfunded public pillar is highly reditsributive. The Swiss multi-pillar pension system: triumph of common sense.

(English) The Swiss multi-pillar pension system book. The authors provide a detailed study of the Swiss pension system, analyzing its strengths and weaknesses.

The unfunded public pillar is highly redistributive. It has near universal coverage, a low dispersion of benefits (the maximum public pension is Cited by: The authors provide a detailed study of the Swiss pension system, analyzing its strengths and weaknesses.

The unfunded public pillar is highly redistributive. It has near universal coverage, a low dispersion of benefits (the maximum public pension is twice the. Downloadable. In this book a distinguished group of contributors discuss the changing political economy of pension reform.

They focus on those countries which have launched a significant reframing of their pension system. Each chapter provides a detailed review of recent pension reforms and offers institutional evidence of the extent to which these reforms suggest a redirection of the welfare Cited by: 4.

Downloadable. The authors provide a detailed study of the Swiss pension system, analyzing its strengths and weaknesses. The unfunded public pillar is highly redistributive. It has near universal coverage, a low dispersion of benefits (the maximum public pension is twice the minimum), and no ceiling on contributions.

Low-income pensioners receive means-tested supplementary benefits. The occupational pension is compulsory for all employed persons with a yearly income of at le Swiss francs ().

Pillar 2 is intended to secure the accustomed standard of living. In combination with pillar 1, it should comprise around 60 to 70 percent of your last salary. Chapter 4: The Institutionalization of the Swiss Multi-pillar Pension System; Chapter 5: The Quality of the Dutch Pension System: Will it be Sustainable in the Twenty-first Century.

C Carve-outs: Germany, USA and Swedish Financial accountsCited by: 4. The Swiss multi-pillar system has been widely praised over the last two decades for its capacity to adjust to shifts in economic and demographic circumstances. The regime also enjoys widespread support in the Swiss population, because its structure means that the pension security of all Swiss residents is based on the interplay of three Cited by: 1.

private sector and a system of DB pensions to the public sector (for example Indonesia). We do not consider these countries “blend”, as they do not offer a combined system to all contributors. In effect, with this design, the so-called Pillar 1 system is instead an unfunded occupational (Pillar 3) system.

The three-pillar system has received much attention and praise from various international institutions. A paper published by the OECD on the Swiss system in hailed Switzerland’s multi-pillar pension system as the The Swiss multi-pillar pension system book of Common Sense”, whereas the World Bank has described the Swiss system as the “way forward for pension reform”.

MULTI-PILLAR PENSION SYSTEM: IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES AND THE INTERNATIONAL PRACTICE 2 INTRODUCTION The Republic of Armenia is fundamentally reforming the pension system conditioned by a number of factors. First and foremost, the existing pension system is financially instable: the collected social.

Multi-pillar pension reforms • Contributions are diverted from the 1 st to the 2 nd pillar, creating larger deficits in the public system in the short- and medium-term. Pension Pillar: One of three pension formats as outlined by the World Bank in and which has since been adopted by many economically reforming countries in Author: Julia Kagan.

The Swiss pensions system has three pillars There are two types of Pillar 3 pensions Diversification, or 'not putting all your eggs in one basket', forms the foundation of the Swiss pension system.

The OECD in a paper on the Swiss system called Switzerland’s multi-pillar pension system a “Triumph of Common Sense.” Pillar 3a Tied pensions. Chapter 4: The Institutionalization of the Swiss Multi-pillar Pension System Chapter 5: The Quality of the Dutch Pension System: Will it be Sustainable in the Twenty-first Century.

C Carve-outs: Germany, USA and Swedish Financial accountsCited by: 7. The book’s key problem is that the chapters from which the editors’ conclusions are Thus, to take two chapters at random, Bonoli’s analysis of the institutionalisation of the Swiss multi-pillar pension system is essentially backward looking, seeking to explain the mechanics of its emergence.

In contrast, the succeeding chapter by Leny Author: Tony Fitzpatrick. Social rights, social justice and pension outcomes in four multi-pillar systems Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Comparative Social Welfare 25(2) June with 82 Reads.

The Four Pillars is a research programme set up in by the Geneva Association, also known as the International Association for the Study of Insurance aim of the Four Pillars research programme is to study the key importance in the new service economy of Social Security, Insurance, Savings and programme focuses on the future of pensions, welfare and employment.

Hungary's pension system suffers from the same problems that afflict most pay-as-you-go (PAYG) systems in Eastern Europe: High system dependency ratios, low retirement ages, lax criteria for disability pensions, increasing evasion, heavy pension costs, and large by:   The differentiated rates are not only a means to redistribute pension income but serve also as a saving measure in light of very generous calculation rules in the past that account for wide differences in monthly old-age pension benefits up to the present: The 10 highest old-age pensions in the statutory pension insurance system in ranged Author: Eva Maria Hohnerlein.

Pension Systems and Old-Age Income Support in East and Southeast Asia Old-age income support will be one of the biggest social and economic challenges facing Asia in the 21st century.

The growing spotlight on old-age income support is largely due to exceptionally rapid population aging which isCited by: 9. A pension (/ ˈ p ɛ n ʃ ə n /, from Latin pensiō, "payment") is a fund into which a sum of money is added during an employee's employment years and from which payments are drawn to support the person's retirement from work in the form of periodic payments.

A pension may be a "defined benefit plan", where a fixed sum is paid regularly to a person, or a "defined contribution plan", under. ‘The institutionalization of the Swiss multi-pillar pension system’, in M.

Rein and W. Schmähl (eds)Rethinking the Welfare State: The Political Economy of Cited by: Abstract The three pillars of a pension system are defined in varied ways. The author focuses on a definition provided by the WorldBank in its Report.

The Swiss Multi-Pillar Pension System: Triumph of Common Sense. Queisser, Monika; Vittas, Dimitri () The authors provide a detailed study of the Swiss. Pension fiche Estonia 1. OVERVIEW OF THE PENSION SYSTEM Description Estonian pension system is based on the three-pillar approach, where the first pillar is the state pension fund and which is included to general government accounts.

Second pillar is mandatory to newcomers to the labour market (and to all the persons born and later). Hausner, J. () ‘Security through Diversity: Conditions for Successful Reform of the Pension System in Poland’, in J.

Kornai, S. Haggard and R. Kaufman (ed.) Reforming the State: Fiscal and Welfare Reform in Post-Socialist by: are reforming their pension systems, moving towards multi-pillar pension systems to limit rises in public expenditure, to broaden risk-sharing and to increase stability in pension provision.

As a result, the importance of occupational pensions in Europe is likely to increase in the Size: KB. reasoning on the benefits of a multi-pillar pension system that consists of unfunded and funded elements to diversify the expo-sure to different of types of risk.

5% 20% 35% 40% 30% 25% 15% Agree strongly 8 0 CH D Agree 12 Undecided 21 Disagree 22 35 Disagree strongly 37 25 0% “The financial crisis has demonstrated that retirement. Solidarity without the State.

This book presents the first comprehensive history of the interplay of public and private provision that made the Swiss “three-pillar” pension system into a model for the World Bank and other pension reformers during the last two decades of the twentieth century.

Through a studyFile Size: KB. the reformed pension systems in Central and Eastern European countries. This revealed a number of issues of these systems that remained unsolved. One of these problems is the one related to the costs of the transition to the multi-pillar system. The funding gap resulted from pension privatization is a supplementary cost.

system is one that has the capacity to withstand major shocks, including those coming from economic, demographic and political volatility. In addition to the primary criteria some secondary evaluation criteria related to the ability of the pension system to contribute to.

distributive implications of this system, however, reveals that the idea of all Swiss pensioners resting securely on three pillars in their old age does not hold true. The Swiss three pillar system, which was established by already, targeted eligibility and coverage mainly at standard employees.

The design of those three hierarchies in current pension system is just the practical use in China of multi-pillar pension model proposed by World Bank in In this paper, I focus on how China works with the World Bank multi-pillar pension model.

I analyze the adoption. pension reform and similar reform attempts in Latin America; the seminal World Bank publication that proposed a multi-pillar pension scheme with a significant shift from publicly managed, unfunded defined benefit (DB) schemes to privately managed, fully funded definedCited by: ENABLING CONDITIONS FOR SECOND PILLARS OF PENSION SYSTEMS By Heinz Rudolph and Roberto Rocha INTRODUCTION Over the past decade the Word Bank has promoted pension reforms entailing the introduction of multi-pillar pension systems.

This approach to reform has many positive aspects but has not been exempt from problems. Multi-pillar. The World Bank pension conceptual framework (English) Abstract.

Since the mid 's, the World Bank has responded to the need to strengthen social insurance and contractual savings systems providing old age income support in developing countries. Consolidating a Multi-Pillar Pension System: The Swiss Case, in: Soziale Sicherung im Alter – Probleme und Informationsbedarf aus der Sicht der Statistik, ed.

by R. Fluder, M. Nolde and A. Wagner, Federal Statistical Office, Neuchâtel. Anderson, Karen M. () Promoting the multi-pillar model? The EU and the shift toward multi-pillar pension systems. In, Borgmann-Prebil, Yuri and Ross, Malcom (eds.) Promoting Solidarity in the Europen Union.

Oxford, GB. Oxford University Press, pp. Author: Karen M. Anderson.Hence, the British multi-pillar system has witnessed a number of structural improvements under the New Labour in the last decade. The first, public pillar has become flat rate and more generous, thereby constituting a social safety net with redistributive features.

The second and third pillars – File Size: 38KB.of pension income from a mix of public (f irst pillar) and work-related (typically second pillar) pensions, can provide a guarantee of adequate pension provision. In its resolution in response to the White Paper, the European Parliament recommended a multi-pillar pension approach consisting of combinations of the three pillars.

It also stressed File Size: KB.